“will stitch for food” t-shirt tutorial

I’m guessing I’m not the only one who would wear a shirt like this so I’ll share how I made it:

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I created a lettering template (here’s one for you- foodshirt pdf), grabbed my t-shirt, and headed for my window. (a regular light box would work fine, but around here I rely on Nature’s Lightbox for all of my tracing needs) Because a t-shirt is floppy and I only have two arms, I had to improvise… I used my curtain and binder clips to hold the shirt so I could center the text and pin it in place.

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After I was sure the paper wasn’t going anywhere I took the shirt off of my curtain, held it against the glass, and used a white Galaxy marker to trace the letters. Pencils don’t work as well on fabric that’s wiggly so I like to use light-colored markers for projects like this.

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I stitched the lettering with white DMC, using a wrapped backstitch. A wrapped backstitch is just what it sounds like; first you stitch the letters in backstitch then you go back and run the needle through each stitch, making sure to stay on top of the fabric. I find it easier to do than a stem stitch and it looks about the same when it’s done.

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I also wanted an extra bit of stitching on the sleeve, so I put a row of Xs along the hemline. If you use the hem stitches as a guideline, it’s easy to make a row of evenly spaced stitches:

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That’s all there is to it! BTW, I’ve had several emails recently from stitchers looking for certain charts of mine, so I’ve decided to make a selection of My Mark designs available in my Etsy shop… easier for you that way, eh?

Thanks so much for all the support and sweet comments; I love hearing from you!

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